IELTS SAMPLE PAPER

Apr 11 • Competition Sample Papers • 3454 Views • 5 Comments on IELTS SAMPLE PAPER

IELTS SAMPLE PAPER

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Dear Supporter,

I am writing to invite you to join us for our Annual Fun Run which will be held this year on Sunday 18th August. The run starts from the school grounds and participants are able to choose to take part in a 2, 5 or 10 kilometer run.

Last year we raised a total of $15,450 which was donated to the children’s hospital and this year we expect to raise over $16,000. This year, we are raising money which will be used to develop the village recreational center.

Off the Northern tip of Scotland, where the Atlantic Ocean meets the North Sea, lies a group of 70 or so islands called the Orkneys. These largely treeless isles are frequently battered by Atlantic storms, gales and rain. It was during one such storm in the winter of 1850, when the combination of wind and high tides stripped away the grass from the top of a small hill called Skerrabra on the west side of the largest island known simply as ‘The Mainland’. This revealed a number of stone dwellings.

The local landowner started excavations on the site, and within twenty years the remains of four ancient houses were unearthed. However, work was later abandoned until 1925 when another storm damaged some of the excavated buildings. A sea wall was proposed to protect the site, and, during construction, yet more buildings were discovered.

It was first believed that the village was an Iron Age settlement, dating from around 1500 years ago. However, radiocarbon dating proved that it was in fact much older. It was a Neolithic village and dated back to 3000 B.C. The village had been inhabited for a period of about 600 years. The Neolithic village of Skara Brae now consists of eight dwellings, connected by low, covered passages. The stone buildings are extremely well-preserved, thanks to the layer of sand that protected the settlement. The interior fittings, furniture and household objects also survive to this day.

The houses were partly built into a mound of waste material known as ‘midden’, which would have provided both stability and a thick layer of thick insulation against the harsh climate. From the outside, the village would have looked like a low, round mound, from which the rooves emerge. Nothing remains of these, so it is assumed that driftwood or whalebone beams supported a roof made of turf, skins, seaweed or straw. The dwellings were all connected by a series of passageways covered by stone slabs. This allowed the villagers to travel from one house to another without stepping outside – not a bad idea, considering the harsh climate. There was only one main passageway leading outside the village, which could be sealed from the inside.

Evidence suggests that there were never more than eight dwellings, suggesting a total population of no more than 100 people. The houses are all very similar in design, consisting of a large square room with a central fireplace. The furnishings were all made of stone, given the shortage of wood on the islands. Two stone-edged compartments on either side of the fireplace appear to be beds. Every house also had a distinctive shelved, stone dresser. Its position, opposite the doorway and illuminated by the fire, indicating that this piece of furniture was not just a useful storage space, but had special significance. There was a sunken floor tank in each dwelling, possibly to supply shell fish. The village also had a remarkably sophisticated drainage system.

One of the buildings, now known as ‘house seven’, is intriguingly different from the others. This building is detached from the others, and has a door which door could only be secured from the outside, suggesting that the house may have served as a type of jail – an unusual necessity in a village of less than a hundred people. ‘House eight’ is also unique, having none of the furnishings of the other houses. Excavators have found that the floor of the building is littered with fragments from the manufacture of tools, suggesting that the room was a workshop.

The standardised house design has led some to believe that there was no hierarchy of rank within the settlement at Skara Brae, and that all villagers were equal. Whether or not this is true is debatable. However, it is likely that life here was probably quite comfortable for the Neolithic people. The villagers kept sheep and cattle, and grew wheat and barley. They probably traded these commodities for pottery. They would have hunted red deer and boar for their meat and skins. They would also have consumed fish, seal and whale meat, and the eggs of sea birds. The skin and bones of these animals would have provided tools such as needles and knives. Flint for cutting tools would have been traded or gathered from the shore.  Fuel probably came from seaweed, making the inside of the dwellings smoky and probably smelly. Driftwood was probably too valuable to burn.

Why Skara Brae was deserted is still unknown. For some time it was thought that the people met with disaster. This theory came about when beads from a necklace were found abandoned on the floor.  It was thought that the woman who dropped them was in too much of a panic to pick them up. However, it is more likely that environmental and social factors forced people to leave. Firstly, the encroachment of sand and salt water would have made farming increasingly difficult. Second, there may have been changes in Neolithic society. Construction of large henge monuments in other parts of the island suggests that an elite ruling body, with the power to control other people, was emerging. Tight-knit communities like the one at Skara Brae were being replaced by larger, organised civilizations.

To confirm your registration, email funrunsuccess@edu.com or telephone 01784 5337841.  As soon as you are registered you simply start collecting your sponsors and come along on the day!

Further instructions are found below, please read them carefully.

Looking forward to seeing you on Sunday 18th August,

D. Jackson

Fun Run Coordinator

Thanks in advance for your support!

Moor fields School Fun Run

START TIMES

10 Kilometers Run – 8 am
5 Kilometers Run – 8.30am
2 Kilometers Run – 9am

ROUTE MAPS
Details are available on our website www.moorfieldsschool.com and will also be available on the day from school reception. All routes will be signposted and there will be marshals stationed along the routes providing cold drinks for runners. If you feel ill or need assistance at any time during the run, please let one of the marshals knows and they will be able to help you.

WHAT TO WEAR
Shorts and tee-shirts should be fine; however, we recommend you bring a light raincoat in case of bad weather. Comfortable running shoes are a must!  Please avoid wearing new trainers on the day to avoid foot problems.

PARKING
The school car park behind C-block (the language department) will be open on the day. Drive in through the main gates then turn right.  West hill Leisure Center (across the road from the school) will also allow runners to park their cars there on the day.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE RUN?
There will be a number of entertainers including face-painting and the school band. Food and drink stalls will be available. There will also be a prize-giving event for runners who finish 1st and 2nd in each of the runs and two cinema tickets are available for the best fancy dress if you are interested in running in a special costume!

We expect the whole day to finish at around 4pm.

Answer the questions below using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the text for each answer.

  1.  How many different lengths of route are there?
  2.  To whom was the money raised in last year’s event given to?
  3.  How much money do the organizers expect to raise this year?
  4. What refreshment will be available from the officials stationed along the route?
  5.  What do all runners have to wear on the day?
  6.  Where can participants leave their cars if they do not park at the school?
  7. What prize can the runner wearing the best costume win?

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A. Learn more about Maori culture, food, dance, performing arts and the internationally famous Haka . The tour involves lectures on Maori traditions an etiquette; particularly customs for welcoming to and visiting a mare – the meeting house of Maori tribes. Experience an authentic cultural show in one of the country’s best-known Maori performance venues.

B. Whether your motivation is to be eco-friendly or simply to enjoy the great outdoors and keep fit while on holiday, our cycling tours of NZ can cater to your needs. Coaches are on hand to transport the group from A to B where distances are far and discounts on wine tours and quad bike tours are also available.

C. Ornithologists unite for this spectacular trip which focuses on the wide variety of species that share our home.  Visit the nesting areas of our native birds and the north island gannet colony of Muriwai.  Guest lecturers will also give an insight into the now extinct species – the Great Moa – the largest bird ever known to have lived on our shores.

D. This tour is a must for appreciators of the outdoors and lovers of what is known in New Zealand as ‘tramping’. Ideal for those who prefer to make their own way, not reliant on transport! See some of the most beautiful countryside Aotearoa (Maori for New Zealand) has to offer.  A reasonable fitness level is required though no steep paths or climbing is involved.

E. An education programme which focuses on lectures and field trips based our the natural world. Visit the Auckland museum to see the informative display of animals and plants of New Zealand. Guest speakers include professors and researchers from our most prominent universities.

F. Where two oceans meet; experience the beauty of nature, the expanse of the land and endless beaches and coastline. Often described as the ‘winter less north’ due to the mild climate, we offer a variety of trips year round.

G. The center of the north island offers many opportunities to experience naturally occurring thermal phenomenon such as the hot pools, mud pools, and geysers in national parks alive with subterranean activity. The tour is three days in duration and accommodation in Rotorua is provided for our clients.

H. Traveling by luxury, air-conditioned tour bus, we partake in some of the best food and beverages New Zealand has to offer. Visit 5 of the country’s largest exporting vineyards and take advantage of the discount pricing available to our clients.

I. We take you to spots inaccessible to regular vehicles. Small group sizes. Plenty of off road travel but made as comfortable as possible in our custom made jeeps. Optional walking tours each day or just relaxation if preferred at our breath-taking picnic stops. N.B. We will soon also be offering excursions in the northern tip of the North island .

Choose the correct title for each tour from the list of tour names below.

List of tours

i.) Wine Lovers Explore
ii.)Hiking in NZ
iii.) 4-wheel drive South Island Extravaganza
iv.) The Traditional Culture of Rotorua
v.) Aotearoa on two-wheels
vi.) An introduction to New Zealand Bird life
vii.) The History of the Moa
viii.) Flora and Fauna Education tour
ix.) Thermal Wonderland tour
x.) Northern Exposure
xi.) Come Scale the Peaks!

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Are you a qualified nanny and have at least 1 year’s post-qualification experience looking after children?

We can help you find a suitable employment position in one of 16 destination countries.

No registration fee applies for job applicants.

What do our services include?

An online ‘matching service’ which allows you to post your CV and we will contact you if any families are interested in offering you a position.

We conduct interviews on behalf of our clients at one of our 4 offices in the U.K.

Arrangement of a return flight, the cost of which will be covered by your employer.

Many positions also include medical insurance for the length of your contract.

Arrangement of full employment contracts between you and your new employer prior to leaving the UK.

A visa assistance service is available for countries where visas are required (additional costs apply)

You are also entitled to:

On-going support throughout your contract in the unlikely event of experiencing difficulties

Access to our ‘Nannies Abroad’ online network and discussion forum .

Access to an agency staff member via our 24-hour emergency contact facility.

Call us for more information on 1800 222 649

About us

Childcare Solutions was established in 1985 by three qualified nannies who returned to the UK after 5 years working overseas. We understand that the opportunity to work abroad appeals to many; however, due to language barriers and safety concerns we realize that many experienced professionals are dissuaded from going ahead with their dream.

Through our established partnerships with sister organizations in 16 countries worldwide, we are able to match child care professionals with appropriate families across the globe.

We have different sized families and different lengths of contract available, so contact us today and let us know what type of work, in which location you are looking for.

Additional requirements to register with Childcare Solutions .

You must:

Be 18 years of age or older

Be able to provide evidence of a clear criminal record in the UK and any other country you have resided in for more than 6 months.

Provide 2 references (at least one from a former position)*
*Where pre-written references are provided we will contact your referees personally to reconfirm.

Provide evidence of qualifications

Be enthusiastic, reliable, flexible and hard-working!

So call us today and let us assist you in fulfilling your career goals overseas.

Do the following statements agree with the information given in the advertisement?

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

  1. Applicants are required to attend an interview with the family interested in offering a work position.
  2.  Childcare Solutions pays for flights for nannies placed in positions overseas.
  3.  Costs of visas vary depending on destination.
  4. The organization was set up by experienced childcare workers.
  5.  Nannies are employed for a minimum of 6 months.
  6. The organization requires recommendations from two previous employers.

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A. The spiritual practice of Reiki was first introduced in early 20th century Japan and continues to be used by its followers today with the intention of treating physical, emotional and mental imbalances and consequent ill-health. The principles of Reiki involve techniques employed by practitioners they say will channel healing energy through the subject’s body, and advocates hold that these techniques can also be used for self-healing. The name of the practice itself stems from two Japanese characters,  pronounced ‘rei’ which translates to ‘unseen’ or ‘spiritual’ and ‘ki’ meaning ‘life force’ or energy’.

B. According to Reiki philosophy, only by undergoing an attunement process performed by a Reiki Master is an individual able to access, then channel this positive energy within, this ability once established is considered to be enduring. Once attuned, it is said that an individual has the ability to allow energy to flow to weak or diseased areas of the body, so activating a natural healing process. Reiki energy is considered to be ‘intelligent energy’ in that it automatically flows to such areas; for this reason, practitioners believe that diagnosis of a specific problem is unnecessary beforehand and that the practice can be used as preventative medicine and encourage healing prior to the onset of tangible symptoms. Since healing initiated by Reiki treatment is entirely natural, many practitioners are confident that it can be used alongside any other type of treatment without adverse affect; however, others recommend that since the patient may undergo significant internal improvement for certain ailments – diabetes, for example – careful monitoring is required since such improvements may establish a need for an alteration in medication requirements.

C. A ‘whole body’ Reiki treatment session typically lasts between 45 to 90 minutes. The subject is required to lie down – often on a treatment table – clothed in comfortable and loose fitting attire. Treatment may involve the practitioner placing their hands on the recipient in a variety of positions; however, some therapists take a non-touching approach, holding their hands a few centimeters away from the body. Hands are usually held in one position for up to 5 minutes before moving on to the next part of the body; between 12 and 20 hand positions are generally used. Those who have undergone a Reiki treatment session often state that they experienced a pleasant warmness in the area of focus and a feeling of contentment and relaxation throughout the session.

D. The healing energy is said to originate in the universe itself and is not the passing of personal energy from practitioner to patient; it is therefore thought to be inexhaustible and the personal well-being of the practitioner uncompromised.  While some masters and teachers hold that subjects must be receptive to the concept in order for energy to flow, others believe that the attitude of the patient is of no consequence and that benefits will follow regardless; for this reason, those following the latter school of thought say that since Reiki requires no conscious belief it can also benefit the well-being of animals and plant life.

E. Controversy surrounds the practice of Reiki, some in opposition as they say that Reiki may offer only a perceived improvement in health and therefore only a ‘placebo’ effect. Whilst the practice of Reiki itself is not necessarily considered potentially harmful, some medical practitioners are concerned that its benefits may be over-estimated by patients and that, as a result, they may ignore or abandon conventional treatments. Others argue against the reliability of Reiki due to the lack of regulation of practitioners, holding that patients may be left vulnerable to illegitimate therapists who lack knowledge and skill. While Reiki is not connected to any particular religious doctrine, some religious leaders oppose the practice for spiritual reasons; however, others hold that the meditative principles involved in treatment have enhanced their own ability to explore and embrace their own particular religion.

F. Limited scientific studies in the authenticity of Reiki have been conducted. During research conducted by the Institute of Neurological Studies at South Glasgow University Hospital it was observed that there was a significant decrease in heart rate and blood pressure amongst subjects receiving 30 minutes of Reiki treatment as opposed to a group receiving placebo treatment of 30 minutes rest. Since the test group consisted of a small number of subjects – just 45 – the research recommendations concluded a requirement for further studies. A similarly small preliminary study into the potential effects of Reiki on patients suffering mild dementia, conducted in the USA, tentatively suggested that treatment had a positive effect on the subjects’ memory abilities; however, research limitations included insufficient analysis of potential placebo affects.

G. Other studies have also attempted to determine correlation between Reiki treatment and improvement in cancer and stroke patients.  Whilst investigations into the first condition indicated a seemingly positive effect on degrees of fatigue, pain and stress experienced by sufferers, the second project failed to reveal a link between treatment and improvement in the subjects’ condition and rehabilitation. Theories have been put forward that the benefits of energy treatments such as Reiki may be scientifically attributed to the effect of electromagnetic fields; however, the majority researchers agree that more extensive investigation is required.

Choose THREE letters A-H

N.B. Your answers may be given in any order

Which THREE of the following statements are true of Reiki?

  • Principles for self-healing differ to those used on others.
  • Attunement is said to have a permanent effect on the recipient
  • Its preventative properties are more significant than cure.
  • There are differences in opinion regarding its use with other therapies.
  • The treatment typically involves contact between the therapist and the patient.
  • The recipient’s own energy is the key to the philosophy.
  • Some therapists believe a pessimistic approach affects results.
  • It is only practiced on human subjects.

Reading Passage 3 has seven paragraphs A-G.

Which paragraph contains the following information?

  • A scientific explanation of why Reiki may have positive effects.
  • An overview of the practicalities of how Reiki is performed.
  • The prerequisite required to experience Reiki benefits.
  • When patients faith and expectations cause concern.
  • The immediate effects that can be experienced by recipients.
  • The safety of conducting therapy for practitioners.

According to the information in the reading passage, classify the following research findings into the benefits of Reiki as relating to

  1. The Institute of Neurological Studies
  2. Research conducted in the USA
  3. Cancer research
  4. Stroke research

Write the correct letter A, B, C or D

  1. The groups’ comfort and quality of life appeared to improve.
  2. No apparent links were identified.
  3. Results were compared to a control group who did not receive Reiki treatment
  4. Recollection ability seemed to be enhanced.

(##)

Off the Northern tip of Scotland, where the Atlantic Ocean meets the North Sea, lies a group of 70 or so islands called the Orkneys. These largely treeless isles are frequently battered by Atlantic storms, gales and rain. It was during one such storm in the winter of 1850, when the combination of wind and high tides stripped away the grass from the top of a small hill called Skerrabra on the west side of the largest island known simply as ‘The Mainland’. This revealed a number of stone dwellings.

The local landowner started excavations on the site, and within twenty years the remains of four ancient houses were unearthed. However, work was later abandoned until 1925 when another storm damaged some of the excavated buildings. A sea wall was proposed to protect the site, and, during construction, yet more buildings were discovered.

It was first believed that the village was an Iron Age settlement, dating from around 1500 years ago. However, radiocarbon dating proved that it was in fact much older. It was a Neolithic village and dated back to 3000 B.C. The village had been inhabited for a period of about 600 years. The Neolithic village of Skara Brae now consists of eight dwellings, connected by low, covered passages. The stone buildings are extremely well-preserved, thanks to the layer of sand that protected the settlement. The interior fittings, furniture and household objects also survive to this day.

The houses were partly built into a mound of waste material known as ‘midden’, which would have provided both stability and a thick layer of thick insulation against the harsh climate. From the outside, the village would have looked like a low, round mound, from which the rooves emerge. Nothing remains of these, so it is assumed that driftwood or whalebone beams supported a roof made of turf, skins, seaweed or straw. The dwellings were all connected by a series of passageways covered by stone slabs. This allowed the villagers to travel from one house to another without stepping outside – not a bad idea, considering the harsh climate. There was only one main passageway leading outside the village, which could be sealed from the inside.

Evidence suggests that there were never more than eight dwellings, suggesting a total population of no more than 100 people. The houses are all very similar in design, consisting of a large square room with a central fireplace. The furnishings were all made of stone, given the shortage of wood on the islands. Two stone-edged compartments on either side of the fireplace appear to be beds. Every house also had a distinctive shelved, stone dresser. Its position, opposite the doorway and illuminated by the fire, indicating that this piece of furniture was not just a useful storage space, but had special significance. There was a sunken floor tank in each dwelling, possibly to supply shell fish. The village also had a remarkably sophisticated drainage system.

One of the buildings, now known as ‘house seven’, is intriguingly different from the others. This building is detached from the others, and has a door which door could only be secured from the outside, suggesting that the house may have served as a type of jail – an unusual necessity in a village of less than a hundred people. ‘House eight’ is also unique, having none of the furnishings of the other houses. Excavators have found that the floor of the building is littered with fragments from the manufacture of tools, suggesting that the room was a workshop.

The standardized house design has led some to believe that there was no hierarchy of rank within the settlement at Skara Brae, and that all villagers were equal. Whether or not this is true is debatable. However, it is likely that life here was probably quite comfortable for the Neolithic people. The villagers kept sheep and cattle, and grew wheat and barley. They probably traded these commodities for pottery. They would have hunted red deer and boar for their meat and skins. They would also have consumed fish, seal and whale meat, and the eggs of sea birds. The skin and bones of these animals would have provided tools such as needles and knives. Flint for cutting tools would have been traded or gathered from the shore.  Fuel probably came from seaweed, making the inside of the dwellings smoky and probably smelly. Driftwood was probably too valuable to burn.

Why Skara Brae was deserted is still unknown. For some time it was thought that the people met with disaster. This theory came about when beads from a necklace were found abandoned on the floor.  It was thought that the woman who dropped them was in too much of a panic to pick them up. However, it is more likely that environmental and social factors forced people to leave. Firstly, the encroachment of sand and salt water would have made farming increasingly difficult. Second, there may have been changes in Neolithic society. Construction of large henge monuments in other parts of the island suggests that an elite ruling body, with the power to control other people, was emerging. Tight-knit communities like the one at Skara Brae were being replaced by larger, organized civilizations.

  • The village of Skara Brae is located on an island called ………………
  • In 1925, …
  • The village is about…

Choose the correct material from the list. You may need an answer more than once. You will not need to use them all.

  • What preserved the village for such a long time?
  • What surrounded the walls and kept the buildings warm?
  • What building material did the villagers lack?
  • What did villagers obtain from other settlements, by exchanging goods?
  • What did villagers burn for warmth and cooking?
  • What were the passage roofs made of?
  • Which piece of furniture appears to be most important?
  • How many of the buildings have identical features?
  • What discovery caused people to believe there had been a disaster at Skara Brae?

(##)

The table below shows CO2 emissions for different forms of transport in the European Union. The Pie Chart shows the percentage of European Union funds being spent on different forms of transport.

Write a report for a university lecturer describing the information shown below.

CO2 emissions per passenger kilometer

co2.gif.pagespeed.ce.Tl8WCUoxPUEU Funds for transport 2007-2013eufunds.gif.pagespeed.ce.S_rRCunBOp

Write the description

Write about the following topic:

The increase in mobile phone use in recent years has transformed the way we live, communicate and do business. Mobile phones can also be the cause of social or medical problems. What forms do these problems take?
Do you think the advantages outweigh the disadvantages of mobile phones?

Give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your own knowledge or experience.

Write at least 250 words

Tell us Your Queries, Suggestions and Feedback

Your email address will not be published.

5 Responses to IELTS SAMPLE PAPER

  1. Manivannan P says:

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  2. mayank sharma says:

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  3. Soubarna Biswas says:

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  4. swarn priya says:

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  5. Kriti Das says:

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